Technical Theatre Individual Events

All Technical Theatre Individual Events must be done on published plays or musicals intended for the theatre. Each event has its own rubric and set of rules, please read carefully. There are seven Categories for Technical Individual Events

Costume Construction

Costume Design

Lighting Design

Scenic Design

Sound Design

Statge Management

Theatre Publicity/ Marketing

Theatre Technology Notes

For All Events

Functions of Design
  1. Establish Location

  2. Establish Time/Period

  3. Reinforce Theme

  4. Reinforce Mood

  5. Social Status of Characters

  6. Movement and Position of Actors

  7. Changing Location

  8. Artistic Style

Elements of Design

1. Space

2. Line

3. Shape

4. Color

5. Texture

6. Scale

7. Typography

8. Dominance/Emphasis

9. Balance

10. Harmony

Helpful Weblink

Principles of Design

1. Unity

2. Emphasis

3. Balance

4. Proportion

5. Rhythm

6. Contrast

7. Movement

8. Pattern

Helpful Weblink

SCRIPT ANALYSIS QUESTIONS

Design is coming up with the ideas for how the show should look, the crew makes the show complete.

Design is a service to the show, the show should not be a slave to it.

Costume Construction

In Costume Construction, the skills measured are:

    • An understanding of the role of costume construction

    • Sewing and construction skills

    • The ability to present and explain the process of constructing the costume

    • Attention to detail

 

Only one entrant may be involved in the construction. No collaborations are permitted. Designs for either theoretical or realized productions are acceptable.

 

The entrant must prepare and present:

    • Up to an eight-minute presentation summarizing the work with connections to concept, collaboration, and design decision-making followed by up to four minutes of Q&A. The overall session, including the Q&A, may not exceed 12 minutes.

    • A fully constructed costume that reflects the entrant’s capabilities and strengths, constructed entirely by the entrant, using a publicly available pattern (for use in a play or musical).

    • Pattern requirement:

      • The costume must be designed, developed and constructed from a pattern available for purchase. The pattern manufacturer's information must be included in the details of the presentation.

      • A pattern designed by the participant cannot be used.

      • There are no restrictions on the costume size. It simply needs to fit the person for which it was built.

    • An itemized expense sheet with accompanying receipts (or digital presentation) for all materials used to construct the costume, such as fabric, thread, buttons, zippers, and trim must be included.

      • Total may NOT exceed $100. If using donated materials, the value must be determined and included in the budget.

      • The cost of the pattern in NOT included in that $100.

      • If millinery, the budget limit is $50. If using donated materials, the value must be determined and included in the budget.

      • The expense sheet must be presented (mounted on a display board or as part of an electronic presentation) as proof that the entrant did not exceed their budget.

    • A costume production collage that focuses on the process of building the costume item (laying out the pattern, cutting the fabric, draping the fabric, etc.).

    • Process photos must depict the garment at various stages of construction - not the participant at a sewing machine.

    • If using a non-digital collage, it must be presented on a 20″ x 30″ heavy stock display board.

    • If using a non-digital display board, it must be labeled in the lower right-hand corner with the entrant’s name, title of play or musical, the pattern number and brand, and troupe number (troupe number is optional). Labels should be considered a part of the presentation; they must be neatly typed or carefully hand lettered.

    • If using a digital presentation, you must bring your own equipment to display your work so all the judges can see the details. The use of a single laptop screen is non-recommended.

    • The garment should be presented on a hanger or, if an accessory, in a box. The entrant should NOT wear the costume to the presentation.

    • Entrants must wear all black

      • Clothing and shoes must be all black. Any visible color, including white, will result in a disqualification

    • Failure to follow any of the guidelines in this document will result in a disqualification

 

Costume Design

In Costume Design, the skills measured are:

    • An understanding of costume design

    • An understanding of the artistic and practical constraints that impact design

    • An understanding of the relationship of costume design to a unifying concept

    • The ability to carry out research into style, period, locale, and genre of the show

    • The ability to present and explain design choices

    • Attention to detail

 

Only one entrant may be involved in the design. No collaborations are permitted. Designs for either theoretical or realized productions are acceptable.

 

The entrant must prepare and present:

    • Up to an eight-minute presentation summarizing the work with connections to concept, collaboration, and design decision-making followed by up to four minutes of Q&A. The overall session, including the Q&A, may not exceed 12 minutes.

    • Five character renderings, either five different characters or a single character through five changes.

      • More than five character renderings will not be accepted

      • No finished costumes are permitted

      • Renderings should be large enough for all the judges to see at one time. In a physical board, 8” to 10”. In a digital board, projections will be the most valuable.

    • Template or trace characters are permitted.

    • Swatches MUST be included and attached to the lower left-hand corner of the display board or if using a digital presentation, a separate physical board with the swatches.

    • The character renderings must each be mounted on either a 10″ x 15″ or 11″ x 17″ heavy stock display board or in a digital board, projections will be the most valuable.

    • The board should be labelled in the following manner:

      • Upper left-hand corner: play or musical title and writer(s)

      • Upper right-hand corner: character’s name, act, and scene

      • Lower right-hand corner: entrant’s name and troupe number (optional)

      • NO other information may be included on the labels

      • Labels should be considered a part of the presentation; they must be neatly typed or carefully hand- lettered.

      • If using a digital presentation, you must bring your own equipment to display your work so all the judges can see the details. The use of a single laptop screen is non-recommended.

    • An artifact binder (physical or digital) – must include a complete set of the following materials:

      • A design statement

      • Complete research

      • Theme of the show

      • Design unifying concept

      • Script requirements

      • Budgetary requirements or other constraints or considerations

      • Sources of inspiration for design and color palette (if used)

      • Preliminary sketches

      • Costume plot (showing who wears what when)

      • If using a digital presentation, you must bring your own equipment to display your work so all the judges can see the details. The use of a single laptop screen is not recommended.

      • Entrants must wear all black

      • Clothing and shoes must be all black. Any visible color, including white, will result in a disqualification

      • Failure to follow any of the guidelines in this document will result in a disqualification

History of Costume Power Point from Dr. Anne Toewe

Part 1

Part 2

Part 3

Part 4

Character boards are a way to show your research on a design you have created. For NIES, the board on the left is similar to what you see to need to complete. You should provide some sort of sketch for the character, tracing the outline is okay, the focus is on the research and what you want built, not on the quality of the artwork itself.

 

Lighting Design

In Lighting Design, the skills measured are:

    • An understanding of the roles and responsibilities of a lighting designer and the technology/equipment to implement and support the design

    • The ability to present and explain design choices

    • An understanding of the artistic and practical constraints that impact lighting design

    • An understanding of the relationship of lighting design to a unifying concept

    • The ability to carry out research into style, period, locale, and genre of the show

 

Only one entrant may be involved in the design. No collaborations are permitted. Designs for either theoretical or realized productions are acceptable.

 

The entrant must prepare and present:

    • Up to an eight-minute presentation summarizing the work with connections to concept, collaboration, and design decision-making followed by up to four minutes of Q&A. The overall session, including the Q&A, may not exceed 12 minutes. The presentation should include:

      • Light plot (1/4″ or 1/2″ equals 1′0″) no larger than 24″ x 36″, which may be rolled, folded, or mounted

indicating all information necessary to assure clear understanding of the designer’s intentions. If using a digital presentation, you must bring your own equipment to display your work so all the judges can see the details. The use of a single laptop screen is non-recommended.

      • The location and identification data of every luminaire, accessory, and specialty unit should be represented on the light plot, along with the following information as appropriate:

        • Color medium

        • Set and masking

        • Areas

        • Lighting positions with labels

        • Type of instrument

        • Unit numbers

        • Circuit

        • Channel

        • Focus/purpose

        • Gobos/patterns/templates

        • Practicals

        • Special instruments (LED, moving lights, foggers, hazers, fans, relays, etc.)

        • Instrument key

      • Title block including:

        • Show title

        • Facility

        • Drawn by

        • Scale

        • Date

    • An artifact binder (physical or digital) – must include a complete set of the following materials:

      • A design statement summarizing:

        • Research done on recurring themes/motifs, given circumstances of the show, writer(s), and previous productions (These could include notes, articles, sketches, photographs, colors, etc.)

        • Theme of the show

        • Unifying design concept



 

        • Script requirements

        • Sources of inspiration

        • Uses of color

        • Techniques used within the design

        • Reflections on the process

        • Instrument schedule

        • Magic sheet/cheat sheet

        • Sample color media used with explanations of choices

        • Description of three light cues organized by act and scene with a stated purpose for the cue and planned timing of the cue. Include a description of the use of intensity, color, movement, directionality, and/or quality of light to communicate to an audience both meaning and emotions during the scene OR three light renderings that include a description of the use of intensity, color, movement, directionality, and/or quality of light to communicate to an audience both meaning and emotions during the scene.

        • If the production was realized, photos should be included.

    • Entrants must wear all black

      • Clothing and shoes must be all black. Any visible color, including white, will result in a disqualification

    • Failure to follow any of the guidelines in this document will result in a disqualification

 

Scenic Design

In Scenic Design, the skills measured are:

    • An understanding of the scenic designer’s role and responsibilities

    • An understanding of the artistic and practical constraints that impact the scenic design

    • An understanding of the relationship of scenic design to a unifying concept

    • The ability to carry out research into style, period, locale, and genre of the show

    • The ability to present and explain design choices

 

Only one entrant may be involved in the design. No collaborations are permitted. Theoretical or realized designs are acceptable.

 

The entrant must prepare and present:

    • Up to an eight-minute presentation summarizing the work with connections to concept, collaboration, and design decision-making followed by up to four minutes of Q&A. The overall session, including the Q&A, may not exceed 12 minutes. The presentation should include:

      • A scale model (physical or digital) showing the design of an entire show (not just a scene) and its relationship to the theatrical space. At least one figure must be included in the rendering or model to show proportion and scale. Model or rendering can be generated through multiple media, such as SketchUp, Vectorworks, or 3-D printers.

        • If using a physical presentation, use 1/4″ or 1/2″ equals 1′0″ OR a perspective rendering (no larger than 11″ x 17″)

        • If using a digital presentation, you must bring your own equipment to display your work so all the judges can see the details. The use of a single laptop screen is non-recommended.

      • Floor plan (physical or digital, drawn to the same scale) for the production that clearly indicates:

        • Performance space

        • Backstage space

        • Audience areas

        • Sightlines

      • Title block including:

        • Show title

        • Floor plan source

        • Scale

        • Entrant name

        • Date

    • An artifact binder (physical or digital) – must include a complete set of the following materials:

      • A design statement summarizing:

        • Theme of the show

        • Unified design concept

        • Script requirements

    • The following may or may not be included in the artifact binder but must be presented:

      • Complete research

      • Sources of inspiration

      • Floor plan

      • Models or renderings - if the student is using a model (instead of a rendering), they must bring the model - photos of a model are not an acceptable replacement

      • Techniques within the design

 

    • Entrants must wear all black

      • Clothing and shoes must be all black. Any visible color, including white, will result in a disqualification

    • Failure to follow any of the guidelines in this document will result in a disqualification

 

Sound Design

In Sound Design, the skills measured are:

    • An understanding of the roles and responsibilities of a sound designer and the technology/equipment to implement and support the design

    • An understanding of the artistic and practical constraints that impact the sound design

    • An understanding of the relationship of sound design to a unifying concept

    • The ability to carry out research into style, period, locale, and genre of the show

    • The ability to present and explain design choices

 

Only one entrant may be involved in the design. No collaborations are permitted. Theoretical or realized designs are acceptable.

 

The entrant must prepare and present:

    • Up to an eight-minute presentation summarizing the work with connections to concept, collaboration, and design decision-making followed by up to four minutes of Q&A. The overall session, including the Q&A, may not exceed 12 minutes. The presentation should include:

      • Sound system plot indicating:

        • Speaker plot showing where on the set and in the performance space loudspeakers are placed

        • The clear relationship of speakers on the plot to speakers on the block diagram

        • Block diagram showing signal flow through the sound system, following the USITT Sound Graphics Standards (available at www.usitt.org)

        • Rack diagrams

        • Microphone schedules

        • Pit diagrams

        • Patch assignments

        • Sound effects, both digital and Foley

        • Programming of the playback device

        • Engineering the show in a live microphone setting

        • Training the actors in the use of microphones

        • Setting preliminary sound levels and adjusting during technical rehearsals

      • Title block including:

        • Show title

        • Facility

        • Source for drawing

        • Scale

        • Entrant name

        • Date

    • An artifact binder (physical or digital) – must include a complete set of the following materials:

  • A design statement summarizing:

    • Theme of the show

    • Unified design concept

    • Script requirements

      • The following may or may not be included in the artifact binder but must be presented:

        • Sources of inspiration

        • Techniques used within the design

        • Representative examples of the sound design to be played on a provided sound system

        • Description of sound cues organized by:



 

          • Act and scene

          • Stated purpose of the cue

          • Planned timing of the cue

      • If using a digital presentation, you must bring your own equipment to display your work so all the judges can see the details. The use of a single laptop screen is non-recommended.

    • Entrants must wear all black

      • Clothing and shoes must be all black. Any visible color, including white, will result in a disqualification

    • Failure to follow any of the guidelines in this document will result in a disqualification

Sound Reinforcement

Sound reinforcement is taking a sound and making it louder, being shaped to fit the space and the production.

Oftentimes troubles happen when actors cannot be heard or understood.

Three Common Problems

     1. Mumbling or quiet actors

     2. Outdated, wrong, or faulty equipment

     3. Audio Technician not trained properly/operator error

Sources of sound

     1.  Live: Whether live musicians or people sound needs to be amplified.

     2.  Prerecorded/Playback or (canned): Sound that has already been purchased or created before a show begins.

Path of Sound

     1. Source of the sound

     2. Receiver of sound (sometimes a direct input or amplifier)

     3. Mixer

     4. Output (Speakers)

Equipment

  Mixer  Analogue v mixer (Sound Board)

  Microphones

    Wired v Wireless: Wireless allows for more mobility for actors, wired creates a more dependable sound

   Types of microphones

     1. Dynamic: Don't need power sources, not very sensitive

     2. Condenser: Accurate sounds, need to have a power source.

   Microphone directions.

       1. Omnidirectional: Pick up sound from all sides

       2. Cardiod: Heart shaped sound pickup pattern

       3. Unidirectional: Sound picked up from one directional

  Kinds of Microphones

     1. Handheld Microphone (Stick mic)

     2. Lavalier Microphone (on head or body)

     3. Floor Mics

     4. Hanging choir microphones

  Speakers

     1. Monitors: Monitors are pointed towards the stage or used in the booth for the sound engineers and actors to hear themselves or the            music clearly.

Sound Design

Sound design involves the inclusion of music and sound effects to a production. Those are the two main categories of sound design.

Can be done live or prerecorded.

 

Process

    1. Read the script for fun

    2. Read the script and mark cues

    3. Pre production meeting

    4. Speaker Placement

    5. Consult with stage manager for cues

    6. Discuss with director which cues will be used

    7. Give a copy of cue list to stage manager, sound operator  SAMPLE CUE LIST.

    8. Record and organize cues

Copyright- We do not have the rights to just reproduce, work to try to get the rights to music and sounds if not already attained.

 

Stage Management

In Stage Management, the skills measured are:

    • An understanding the stage manager’s role and specific responsibilities

    • An understanding of the purpose and value of a production book

    • The ability to organize stage management ideas, products, and choices that support a realized production.

 

Only one entrant may be involved in the presentation. No collaborations are permitted. The entrant’s presentation must be from a realized production

 

The entrant must prepare and present:

    • Up to an eight-minute presentation summarizing the work with connections to concept, collaboration, and design decision-making followed by up to four minutes of Q&A. The overall session, including the Q&A, may not exceed 12 minutes. The entrants should:

      • Approach the process as if interviewing for a college stage management program or a job

      • Discuss a realized production either in their middle or high school program or a community or professional theatre

      • Articulate the role of the stage manager/stage management process in the focused production

      • Address the collaborative process with cast, crew, director, and production team

      • Effectively communicate an understanding of the stage manager’s role as it relates to the focused production

      • Show personality and style

      • Exhibit consistency, clarity, and organization

    • A production book (a binder containing components of the stage management promptbook and paperwork used to perform responsibilities) should include but is not limited to:

      • Prompt script with blocking and all technical cues, such as lights, sound, deck, etc. This may be broken into two scripts

      • Examples of contact sheet, cast list, rehearsal schedule, props list, sound and lighting cue sheets

      • A written statement of the director’s artistic concept of the production that includes a discussion of the theme and how the theme was executed

    • Entrants must wear all black

      • Clothing and shoes must be all black. Any visible color, including white, will result in a disqualification

    • Failure to follow any of the guidelines in this document will result in a disqualification

What does a stage manager do in a show?

"Stage managers have several key responsibilities and tasks to perform in each phase of a production, including: scheduling and running rehearsals. communicating the director's wishes to designers and crafts people. coordinating the work of the stage crew. calling cues and possibly actors' entrances during performance" (AACT).

A good production needs a strong stage manager helping lead the cast and crew. A stage manager's role is split into three sections, pre rehearsals, rehearsals, and the production itself. The role of the stage manager does change from program to program, and from educational theatre to professional theatre, but there are some helpful expectations and templates.

Before Rehearsals

The stage manager should be involved in the production before auditions even begin. The stage manager is at the center of making sure everything runs smoothly from the director, the technical director, the designers, the actors and the technicians. Communication, organization and collaboration are essential in the stage manager's role.

PRODUCTION ANALYSIS:

Both a helpful tool and a major task. As you read the script, break the script down to all the needs of the script. Focusing on cast, set, lights, sound, costumes, music, special effects, props and the major action of the scene. While this will take some time up front, it will save you time in the long run and make you that much more familiar with the script. This is not for design purposes, the designers design, but it is for helping them in their job.​

Light/Sound/Set/Prop/Costume/Other Plots: These lists break down each major technical needs of a show in a way that is easy for others to see. These can often be easily adapted from your production analysis.​

AUDITIONS: Make sure you and your director have made an audition contract for the actors and technicians. You can create an audition form on paper (template provided) or you can create one on Google forms. The same can be done for an audition sign up.

  The stage manager should be the first person an actor sees and should be completely organized. Make sure any system you use works for the actors, the director, and you. If you have an assistant stage manager, this is a good time to divide and conquer to make sure everything is done smoothly and accurately.

  When it comes to auditions and callbacks, make sure you know what your director wants from the actors and try to make that happen.

  Create a contact list during the audition process, that way when it comes time to contact the cast, you already have it done.

PRODUCTION MEETINGS:

Production meetings are an essential tool for communication for stage managers with the director and the different designers. Weekly or biweekly meetings to meet, discuss, establish deadlines and work out conflicts and disagreements before they become too large.​

During Rehearsals

 

THE FIRST READ THROUGH: The first read through is important for the stage manager because it is when you get to establish yourself and your role in the production. Make sure all contact information is gathered by the end of rehearsal. Also make sure the rules and consequences are clear, if those are not clear actors will press boundaries.

SCHEDULING: The director is in charge of who they want when. But it is up to the stage manager to keep track of conflicts to aid in the scheduling. It is also important to know who is needed when. Actors who are not busy at rehearsals become distracted and then become distractions themselves. Use your calendar, production analysis to only call actors when they are needed.

BLOCKING: Blocking is one of the most important jobs a stage manager has during the rehearsal process. Actors rarely remember where they are supposed to be and forget to write it down. Blocking can be done in two ways, short hand markings on the script itself or by making diagrams on the pages opposite of the script. Examples will be shown.

Examples for blocking shorthand.

STAGE MANAGER'S KIT: Stage Managers should always have a box of items including pencils, highlighters, and many other essential items.  For a more complete example of a kit, CLICK HERE.

REHEARSAL RULES: You and your director must set rehearsal rules. These rules are to aid in a better rehearsal process, not to punish. Develop and post rules regarding, tardies, absences, cell phones, guests, talking, when students are off to be off book, etc. Make sure these are posted for students.

CALLBOARD: Have both an online/digital source of information but also have a physical call board students know to check. This callboard should include, but not limited to, rehearsal time, special notices, announcements and other needs.

COMMUNICATION:

Make sure you have a definite source of communicating information to actors, technicians, designers, and adults involved in the production. If you have multiple sources, make sure you constantly update all of them.

REHEARSAL SCRIPT: The rehearsal script is essential in the process of recording information. This book would include all your notes, all rehearsal reports, all information related to the show.

PRODUCTION MEETINGS and REHEARSAL REPORT:

Keep up your production meetings and write and distribute rehearsal reports for all rehearsals. This information is crucial and designers need it to do their job. Save yourself stress and complete these as detailed as you need.

REHEARSAL REPORT TEMPLATE

REHEARSAL REPORT SAMPLE

During/After Production

OPENING NIGHT: Opening Night can be nerve racking for actors and technicians alike, that is okay, if they are nervous, it shows they care. You need to be steady and calm with them though, you are that link. Make sure everything is prepared, if you have done their job, they can do theirs.

PRESHOW: Have a preshow checklist for all technicians. Check all props, costumes, set pieces, etc. Make sure these are posted and distributed. You should have one for yourself as well. Run through these lists with your technicians before opening night and never assume it will be done unless it is marked down.

CALLING CUES: Calling cues is vital in the process of the show, there should be one person in charge of a show, no exceptions. When calling cues, make sure you come up with a pattern and rhythm your technicians are familiar with.

Try to use letters for sound and numbers for lights.

HANDLING CONFLICTS: You are the boss, try to handle conflicts. If it needs to go to the teacher it can, but if you can resolve it, do so. Good stage managers can resolve conflicts and prevent them from happening again. Learn and adjust and move forward. One example of a way to handle stressful situations is to eliminate talking on headset with a constant standby.

​​

PRODUCTION REPORTS:

Fill out production reports just like you did rehearsal reports. These are helpful for keeping records as to what happened each night.

 

Theatre Marketing/Publicity

In Theatre Marketing, the skills measured are:

    • An understanding the marketing director’s role and specific responsibilities

    • An understanding of the purpose and value of research, resources, and personnel needed to communicate a marketing concept to an audience

    • The ability to align a marketing campaign’s components in a distribution strategy that supports a realized production

 

Only one entrant may be involved in the presentation. No collaborations are permitted. The entrant’s presentation must be from a realized production.

 

The entrant must prepare and present:

    • Up to an eight-minute presentation summarizing the work with connections to concept, collaboration, and design decision-making followed by up to four minutes of Q&A. The overall session, including the Q&A, may not exceed 12 minutes. The presentation should include:

      • A case study that methodically works through the marketing process

      • The marketing campaign developed and executed for a published script (play or musical) written for the theatre and presented by the school

        • Designs for performances of poetry, fiction, screenplays, or any other medium are prohibited

        • It is strongly recommended that the entrant was responsible for actual publicity

    • Entrants should bring a portfolio binder for adjudicators that contain the components of their marketing campaign, including:

      • A finished poster

      • A finished program

      • Two press releases consisting of an informational article and a feature article

      • A copy of the marketing budget for the publicity campaign and justification of expenses

      • Any work that shows the progression of the creative process, including a brief statement of the design choices inspired by the script, research materials, and other sources of inspiration, if any

      • Work will be adjudicated on creativity and results; not necessarily how much money was in the budget and how well the money was spent

    • Presentation Format:

      • Background

      • Introduce self and Thespian troupe number

      • Description of the show

      • Dates and number of performances

      • Description of executing the marketing plan (self and/or team responsibility)

      • Creative development

      • Collaboration with production team

      • Target market (outside of school)

      • Research or inspiration to develop the design concept, if any

      • How the marketing design concept matches the production design

      • The development and creation of the marketing campaign’s design concept

      • Reflections on what might be done differently if more time, money, etc., were available

    • Execution:

      • Describe and demonstrate the components of the marketing campaign (posters, tickets, promotional handouts, social media, etc.)

      • Explain how and where the marketing was distributed

With marketing, it comes to one key goal, get people to see the shows and to help make the shows profitable. There are many different ways to do this, some are standard, some are up to the publicist/marketer to come up with some innovative ways to bring money in.

Marketing Tools

Visual Advertising

   Posters

   Flyers

   Table tents

   Banners

   Magnets

   others...

Programs

   Advertising

Digital/Social Media

   Social Media

   Theatre Website

   Email list

Community Outreach

   Working with clubs

   Teacher/Classroom Connection

   Mailing Lists

   Buddy/Sister Troupes

Press Outreach

   Commercials

   Press Release

   Feature News Article

Budgeting

Season Planning

Fundraising

Special Events

Social Media

We live in a digital world and students are on their phones and devices much of the time. Be sure to check with the school about what social media you can use. But use what you can.

  Facebook

  Twitter

  Instagram

  YouTube

   Snapchat

   Find what your community is using and reach them

Website

Create a website for your theatre. It is good to help advertise your shows, your program, and your program's history.

EMAIL List

Find ways to use email or other distribution lists to inform your patrons monthly about what is going on in your troupe or when a show is coming up. People will forget.

Press Outreach

Key details to have

What is the show.

Name of the group performing

Who is in the show.

Where is the show.

How much tickets are.

Where can people get tickets

Contact information.

Necessary copyright information

Commercials for the morning announcements can be much more impactful than a simple press release. Work with video production to make a innovative and interesting commercial.

Press Releases can be sent to both school news organizations and to local press. Some will ignore it but sometimes your show will get mentioned on the air and can have a big impact. Create new version for school announcements to keep people interested.

A featured news article can be done before a show airs and covers the purpose of the show and not just the facts. Why is this play being done now.

Visual Advertising

For all advertising

Key details to have

What is the show.

Name of the group performing

Who is in the show.

Where is the show.

How much tickets are.

Where can people get tickets

Contact information.

Necessary copyright information

The sample to the right is based on a poster, but applies to all visual advertising, though some smaller ads may require less information

Posters can be in a variety of sizes, 11x17 inch is easily framed

14x22 is a standard Broadway Poster

Know your printer capabilities and check cost.

Flyers are small posters, like a sheet of paper or a half/quarter page.

Table tents are good for the cafeteria, they are folded over and placed where students are focused for a short time each day.

Banners are large posters and can cost more, do these wisely.

Community Outreach 

Working with clubs

  Find ways to collaborate.

  Visual arts could create art for the show

  Full performing arts involvement in a musical.

  Publicity and marketing opportunities

  Graphic design help with posters and programs.

  Work with the newspaper for publicity.

  Work with video production for commercials.

  By involving other groups, they are more likely to attend.

Teacher/Classroom

   Work with classes where shows apply.

   English, Social Studies, Science all may have interest in shows with certain themes.

Mailing Lists

  Create a mailer for your student body, their parents, and even the community that surrounds your school. It is amazing how often people would have gone to see a certain show if they had only known.

Buddy/Sister Troupes

  Work with troupes in your area. Arrange for your thespians to go see their shows, they will be more likely to see yours.

  Set up a ticket exchange, offer them a couple of free tickets. If two come for free, more may come with them.

  Stay in contact with the troupes, they can be great supporters for your program.

Programs

Programs are used to help keep a record of the show. They can also be used to raise money.

Record Keeping

  This is a chance for the actors and technicians to have a record of the shows they were in. They offer a chance to keep track of

   Who was in the show

   Who did what

   Photos

   and more....

Fundraising

  Work with the director to create an advertising contract.

 Also create a chance for shout outs. Parents and students can appreciate these opportunities.

SAMPLE PROGRAM

Other Ways to Market

Budget: Having a budget for your plans is important. Your director may set the budget for you, they may work with you. It is important as a marketer to try to make all your ideas bring in more money than they cost. Have a budget before you start advertising and use your money wisely.

Season Planning: A common theme for shows is helpful, but not required. Regardless of theme, always find opportunities to advertise the remaining season when possible. Make connections to shows. Don't just come see Show A, Show B is just as good an relates back to what you just saw.

Fundraising: Sometimes to help offshoot the costs of a show, fundraising can be done by the cast. Try to find new ways when possible, anyone can do chocolate sales, most do. Come up with ways to work with local businesses to find unique opportunities. You can also fundraise for outside groups or causes. Sometimes people are more likely to donate when they know you are not doing it just for yourself.

Special events: Find ways to bring in people for extra (sometimes charged) events. Doing a show with a Disney Princess, young girls will love to do Tea with (insert princess). Doing a show with combat and you have a trained instructor, do a basic combat workshop.

 

NEW

Makeup Design

Makeup Design

In Makeup Design, the skills measured are:

  • An understanding of makeup design

  • An understanding of the artistic and practical constraints that impact design

  • An understanding of the relationship of makeup design to a unifying concept

  • The ability to carry out research into style, period, locale, and genre of the show

  • The ability to present and explain design choices

  • Attention to detail

 

Only one entrant may be involved in the design. No collaborations are permitted. Designs for either theoretical or realized productions are acceptable.

The entrant must prepare and present:

  • Up to an eight-minute presentation summarizing the work with connections to concept, collaboration, and design decision-making followed by up to four minutes of Q&A. The overall session, including the Q&A, may not exceed 12 minutes.

  • Five character renderings, either five different characters or a single character through five changes.

    • More than five character renderings will not be accepted

    • For these purposes, teeth and hair are considered makeup

    • Renderings should be 8" to 10" tall and must be in full color

    • Board stands are optional.

    • The board should be labelled in the following manner:

      • Upper left-hand corner: play or musical title and writer(s)

      • Upper right-hand corner: character's name, act, and scene

      • Lower right-hand corner: entrant's name and troupe number (optional)

      • NO other information may be included on the labels

        • Labels should be considered a part of the presentation; they must be neatly typed or carefully hand lettered.

  • A makeup binder - must include a complete set of the following materials:

    • A one-page design statement

    • Complete research

    • Theme of the show

    • Design unifying concept

    • Script requirements

    • Budgetary requirements or other constraints or considerations

    • Sources of inspiration for design and color palette (if used)

    • Techniques used within the design

    • Preliminary sketches

    • Makeup plot (showing who wears what makeup when)

  • Entrants must wear all black

    • Clothing and shoes must be all black. Any visible color, including white, will result in a disqualification

  • Failure to follow any of the guidelines in this document will result in a disqualification

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CONTACT US

4966 Calvary Ct Las Vegas, NV 89141

Tel: 702-296-0109

nvthespians@gmail.com

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